The Stranger

A friend just sent me this in an email, and I think it’s quite right – it’s required reading, so read on!

The Stranger!

A few years after I was born, my Dad met a stranger who was new to our small town. From the beginning, Dad was fascinated with this enchanting newcomer and soon invited him to live with our family. The stranger was quickly accepted and was around from then on.

As I grew up, I never questioned his place in my family. In my young mind, he had a special niche. My parents were complementary instructors: Mom taught me good from evil and Dad taught me to obey. But the stranger… he was our storyteller. He would keep us spellbound for hours on end with adventures, mysteries and comedies.

If I wanted to know anything about politics, history or science, he always knew the answers about the past, understood the present and even seemed able to predict the future! He took my family to the first major league ball game. He made me laugh and he made me cry. The stranger never stopped talking, but Dad didn’t seem to mind.

Sometimes, Mom would get up quietly while the rest of us were shushing each other to listen to what he had to say and she would go to the kitchen for peace and quiet.
(I wonder now if she ever prayed for the stranger to leave.)

Dad ruled our household with certain moral convictions, but the stranger never felt obligated to honour them. Profanity, for example, was not allowed in our home – not from us, our friends or any visitors. Our long time visitor, however, got away with four-letter words that burned my ears and made my dad squirm and my mother blush.

My Dad didn’t permit the liberal use of alcohol but the stranger encouraged us to try it on a regular basis. He made cigarettes look cool, cigars manly and pipes distinguished.

He talked freely (much too freely!) about sex. His comments were sometimes blatant, sometimes suggestive and generally embarrassing.

I now know that my early concepts about relationships were influenced strongly by the stranger. Time after time, he opposed the values of my parents, yet he was seldom rebuked… And NEVER asked to leave. More than fifty years have passed since the stranger moved in with our family. He has blended right in and is not nearly as fascinating as he was at first. Still, if you could walk into my parents’ den today, you would still find him sitting over in his corner, waiting for someone to listen to him talk and watch him draw his pictures.

His name?…. We just call him ‘TV.’

(Note: This should be required reading for every household!)
(Keep scrolling…)

He has a wife now….we call her ‘Computer.’

Their first child is “Cell Phone”. Second child “I Pod”

And just born a few years ago a Grandchild: “IPad”

God Bless you

Lis

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1 John 3:15 and the latest smart phone app.

Yes, it’s a game – you know, life. And death. And shooting people. If you like shooting people, you can immerse yourself in a computer game and pretend you are at war. All the time you do this you are safely blinkered from the reality that killing – the kind of killing that you might desire to do (online, or anywhere else), makes you a murderer in your heart.

God tells us:

Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him. 1 John 3:15

So the latest smart phone app takes this one step further. Instead of having to pretend to be a warrior amongst other online warriors to get your fill of death and mayhem, you can now, in real time, pretend to shoot your boss.

From the article about Mobile Gun Android, I quote: (Link)

If you’ve ever felt frustrated with your boss, friends or family, a controversial new app has been created to help you take out that aggression. 

The Mobile Gun Android app lets you shoot enemies in augmented reality using a 9mm pistol, an assault rifle, sniper rifle or rocket launcher.

To use it, you simply aim your phone camera at your target, tap when the sight on the screen is lined up, and shoot. 

While its creators say the app is simply a bit of ‘fun’, others claim such violent games can lead to violence in real-life. 

I’m not interested so much in whether this will lead to ‘real’ violence or not (I suspect it does), I’m interested in what God thinks about your heart when you decide that the best way to ‘take our that aggression’ you feel for your boss or family member is to pretend to shoot them!

I don’t know about you, but for me this is a huge step in the wrong direction. To aim a smart phone at a target person – someone you hate in your heart, and pretend to kill them? I can see that this is not just a step up from the computer game, this takes things into the realm of fulfilling fantasy. If your fantasy is to kill your boss, then God has a word for you. Again:

Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him. 1 John 3:15

This is not a matter of life and death – it’s a matter of eternal life and eternal death.

God Bless you

Lis

Mercedes says it’s driverless cars won’t swerve to avoid running over a child

We’re going to have to face the facts here – unless we choose to reject this technology, we will see the tech decide on life and death situations which our instincts would normally have to resolve. Human instincts are created by God – each and every one of us has had to take evasive action on the road at some time, and sat shaking afterwards, amazed to have got out of it unscathed. Machines will have no such scruples, no such instincts. They will weigh your value against the value of the person, or in this case, child, who has just run out into the road. (source)

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What is truly astonishing is the comments on the article – commenters saying that this is perfectly understandable, and:

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Um – yah know, we don’t normally ‘incarcerate’ kids to protect them from driverless cars – is this going to become the norm?

This comment at least made me laugh:

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Mercedes and other car manufacturers need to realise that we DO NOT want this driverless technology. The ONLY benefit of this is for those who are unfit to drive (in which case what is wrong with public transport) and the ELITES! The elites want this so badly. Why?

Your driverless car can be hacked – you p*ss someone off, and whoops, your car drives into a bridge support.

Your driverless car is a prison cell on wheels – commit a ‘crime’ and find yourself being driven in a locked car to the nearest police station/detention centre/FEMA camp.

Need I go on? Thankfully a few are awake:

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We are very naive if we think this is safe or acceptable technology. We may have to become Neo-Luddites to prevent it, though.

God Bless you

Lis